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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 326 (some duplicates have been removed)
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i
technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capity bri neorms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast pdict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any real authority. the vocabulary in which an
's face it, the middle class was getting hammered, long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive but also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceos' salaries exploded and pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. and these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. we can't wish these and global competition wlsh here's what i know, wisconsin, we can meet that because we're americans, and we have the world's best workers and the world's best aupt paren irs. we have the best scientists and the best researchers, the best colleges and ooufrtsz, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. in this new century and there's not a country in the earth that wouldn't change places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose ou
hammered long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. in these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. can' away. but here's what i know, wisconsin. we can meet them. because we're americans. we've got the world's best workers and the best entrepreneurs. we've got the best scientists and the best researchers. the best colleges and universities, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy in this new century, and there's not a country on earth that wouldn't trade places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose our next president. and it's more than just a choice betwe
. get headed in a new direction. with humira, remission is possible. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. cc hey kev, how about a bike ride? you're not my dad ahh!! hey honey, back feels better, little dancing tonight, you and me? dr. scholl's pro inserts relieve different types of lower body pain by treating at the source so you're a whole new you. go pro with dr. scholl's. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multi-vitamin designed for men's health concern
percent. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the employment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward pressure on oil. oil giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggest percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of estimates. similar to exxon mobil, chevron also saw its production and fuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in august, legal troubles in braziand a refiry fire in california. shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i
. check it out. 1% higher on the industrial average. technology among the better performers. you have the nasdaq composite up 42 points, that's 1.5%. s&p 500 looks like this. nasdaq at the highest levels of the afternoon right now. s&p, very close to it. up about 15 points. better than 1%. >> pretty good gains. let's dig deeper into the rally, what we can expect from the jobs numbers tomorrow. >> gentlemen, good to see you. thanks for joining us. gary, let me kick this off with you. you think market rally today is sustainable? >> well -- hi, maria. yeah, thank you. you know, it's kind of a combination of a good technical and fundamental rally. you know, a great confluence, almost a perfect confluence of positive economic numbers this morning. jobless claims, payroll, productivity, consumer confidence, manufacturing. all pointing to a, you know, a steady recovery. you got china on top of that with their gdp improving. so it's given the market a lot more confidence as far as the stability of our recovery. >> dan, what do you think of this rally? especially on the first day of a new mont
that technology was invented by somebody and it was invented by scientists that put together an idea and figured out how to make it work. >> that's true. we see innovation as the practical expression of imagination where you turn ideas into reality. and we're all about that here at the tech museum of innovation. >> what are some of the other exhibits? >> well, if you come to the tech museum you may want to get tickets to "mythbusters" an amazing exhibit. you can see the blueprints and if you get more wet whether you walk on run through the rain. you can play with react table where you move blocks around to may musical compositions and come down to our hands on on science workshop and build your own plane. >> that's one of the really neat things down here is not just sitting here in a class and learning about science but you get to do some real hands on stuff so you can understand how things work. >> it's true. you know, bay area science festival is all about unleashing your inyour scientists and tech museum. we want to help unleash your inner science. >> reporter: totally for geeks like me but i
, the overweight banks energy real estate as well as information technology, they're pounding the tables here, but the question is, do better economic numbers mean that investors can go in and invest? >> i think that the classic ones, joy global, i think does make sense, i like the upgrade this morning. the caterpillar deeply inclined. china not coming back, maybe they're so concerned about caterpillar that they're saying it's not coming back that fast. >> we got adp stateside, jim, as well as the estimate. a big revision, they change d d. >> i thought the paychecks were two that really looked like numbers. and so i'm willing to say that this -- it makes so much more sense, but i keep trying to say what industry is doing the hiring in terms of construction. bigger size, small business, but construction yes, balanced against what i regard seeing is uncertainty in the banking industry, where they lay off, government sees more- >> we have ceos sit over here, what you're going to do with the money, or how many people you're going to hire, it's not tens of thousands, but it's something. and they'r
? >> spotty. the technology we had internet service problems but the exchange has been unbelievable with their support. we were here early and they got us up and running. we're here as a physical presence. we're ready. >> you have hand helds. data feeds are working for hand helds. >> absolutely. that's one thing we nailed down to make sure we can get orders. the specialists are ready at the post ready to trade and open stocks a the 9:30. >> you have cell phones that you communicate with offices and sometimes when needed with clients. that's very spotty right now. two of the big downtown stations for verizon have been damaged. what are they doing to make sure that's working? >> they're working around the clock. they are going to try to get that open today. we have other ways to getting on this thing. creative ways down here, believe me. we can figure it out. >> neil, thank you very much. one of the things they have done here that's very creative is they have raised the threshold for the auto execution for the designated market makers. these are guys that used to be called specialist.
to an oilfield where companies like chevron having drilling for more than 60 years. but new technology would allow that drilling to expand to places where the oil lies much deeper. 14billion barrels of oil reserves could now finally be accessible in the hills and valleys beyond san ard doe in an area known as the monterey shale. >> these are source rocks for oil and gas. >> reporter: this physicist says shale oil is harder to harvest. you need go down and out horizontally in a technique called fracking. >> now we have technology, enabling technologies, that allow these reservoirs to be produced economically. >> reporter: with oil at almost $90 a barrel, he predicts things are about to change. fast. >> there's just a lot more activity and a lot of that activity is in places where there hasn't been much for a long period of time. >> reporter: in monterey county oil prospectors are knock on the doors of landowners trying to buy up leases. >> now all of a sudden, the people that drilled for oil are more interested in going out and getting these mineral rights for property owners. >> reporter: th
technology to insulate the pumps but water still got in. and they found out it got in to the point where it damaged the pumps irreparably and that's why the evacuation occurred. >> i think it is fair to say the hospitals are doing an extraordinary job under what must be desperately difficult conditions. i want to sink single them out. both of the hospitals, the nurses and doctor and the workers down there are doing a herculean job but why would you plan a hospital that are near water where you have a key part of the power system in the basement? it doesn't make any sense to me? >> it has been widely discussed. i don't know the full answer. one thing about putting fuel in the hospital they want to put it closer to the ground because transporting it in terms of safety could be a concern. they have encapsulated the fuel pumps and containers in what they thought was good technology to try to keep them water resistant. i talked to the president of the hospital, the guy that runs the show here and it was similar, some of the answers we got last night on your program. they said they thought the
about the new tech knowledge offered at the -- technology offered at the center. the fda approved cutting edge technology is a first for our area and a giant leap forward for the former greater southeast community hospital. >> first of all, the radiation dose is half of the standard mammogram. and number two, the detector itself is twice, three times, more greater in density compared to standard mammogram technology. so that the image quality is superior to standard mammograms. >> reporter: microdose works using a foeton detector. that helps to produce a sharper more clear image of the breast. >> this actual piece moves across the breast. like a fan. and so every picture that every x-ray beam that comes out is perfectly focused from here to the breast tissue to the detector. >> reporter: while maintaining quality and accuracy, dr. tu says studies show cutting the radiation in half also lowers the small risk of radiation induced breast cancer. one less methodical concern for -- medical concern for his parents who come from d.c -- patients who come from d.c. wards 7 and 8 and boardi
years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the average investor that buys and sells stocks. you know, needs access to the markets. it makes no sense. this does not make sense. liz: on any other day you would never see what i'm about to show you and that is a shot of the big board at zero at 3:28 p.m. >> here's the thing, the big board's electronic station is located in chicago. liz: i know. >> its data system is in new jersey. the nasdaq has its system that's not -- i don't even know. i think it is in bethesda to be honest with you. liz: are you saying this is political? >> i don't know what it is. somebody screwed up here and this is a big thing. bond market is an over-the-counter market, maybe they are just -- who knows how it is not trading. i'm just telling you this that someone has to answer why the technology that -- why the brokers backed off on this, an
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. ♪ [applause] neil: whooping it up there tonight and why he has targeted florida, another one of the most when states. in most of the polls he is leading, not all of them. that's what makes him such a dicey guy, but he is selling the red meat to a group of very loyal partisans, but he does have a good shot at winning estate. ohio is looking more problematic certainly michigan. florida, they always talk about you have to win ohio, but an order to jump-start that you have to win florida. certainly more confidence in the sunshine state than at present they are in any other state. monitor what he's saying about the economy. help s
drove the market today. stocks pushing higher to date with all industries rally. materials, technology and industrials for two days top performers. utilities did leg a little bit. the prior week's figure was revised higher by 3,372,000. u.s. construction spending rose to its highest level in almost three years in september. spending rose 0.6%. liz: we have tim mulholland at the cme and brian of wells fargo financials. plus, robert gray ready to break in with earnings. first, let's start with tim. not bad at all. you have to admit it looked pretty healthy and good, especially after october. do you think that this november rally has legs? q it has been a good day following that tax related mutual fund selling that ended yesterday. we got into a good start. china coming of better. adp gains. lower jobless claims. optimism for tomorrow's employment report. it may turn into a rally in november. most importantly, we have the election coming up next week. david: him, stay where you are. we want to bring in brian. it was a surprising three digit gain on the dow and s&p. were you surprised and,
that warning because, with today's technology and the skill we have, there is no reason to lose lives unnecessarily. >> speaking of today's technology, i think we can take a look at a picture from nasa, a picture speaks a thousand words and perhaps few images can define the magnitude of this monster storm than this one, snapped from the international space station. this is more than 900 miles wide, bearing winds of nearly 90 miles per hour. you know, jim, did you ever think you would have an opportunity to really be taking pictures of this massive phenomenon that would include, you know, massive snow amount, blizzard conditions in some ports of the -- parts of the country and fluting in others and high hurricane-force winds? >> caller: if we sat down and i showed you recorded notes and other photographs, having done this 21 years, there is a pattern. i have seen more storms, i have seen bigger storms and i can't tell you why, you but i have been shooting more pictures and brewing more people. i think we have entered a new age of weather. i hope this is the last sandy-type storm we eve
images. >> you know, this is modern technology meets mother nature. we have people capturing this, we just got a message, hoping that everybody is safe, sound, a lot of people are still suffering. our reporters went out through stricken areas, documenting who life is like. >> this is a line for gas, and it started way, way back there. this is absurd, oh, my god, i'm not getting gas, there is no way i'm getting gas. >> we are walking the 59th bridge in new york city back from work. we have had about a three mile walk both ways. but it is just what new yorkers do. we're coming from queens, going back to our home in long island. we're not the only ones, every which way you look, everybody is doing their own thing. >> there is no traffic cops, not good, not good. >> this is what is in front of our building, that is my building in the back. this went all the way through the building. there is no fences left. >> i'm a train operator, i'm supposed to report here. and it is a ghost town. this is cone island station. normally it is hustle, bustle here, nothing but muck on the street level. >>
portable devices work seamlessly. >> using standard voice over technologies ill it allows you to hook radios into the infrom a structure. >> there are 300 volunteers going through specialized training. cisco won't say how much money is involved except to say lending a helping hand is priceless. >> breezy point neighborhood in queens new york almost burned down. howling winds blew flames from house to house. the fire storm destroyed at least 80 homes. it took 200 firefighters 12 hours to contain the blaze. no serious injuries were reported and no word on what caused this fire. >> snow continues to fall in west virginia. a floot footh reported in lower elevations. the blizzard left 250,000 people without power. many roads and highways are closed. one death from a storm snow is falling on the tennessee-north carolina border, as far as maryland. >> the storm keeping both presidential campaigns on the campaign trail. instead, former president clinton campaigned on mr. obama's behalf where' tacked mitt romney's position on climate change. >> he ridiculed the president for his efforts to fig
. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today.
. >> tom: much more positive, much more constructionive. technology which had been a laggard, nasdaq, certainly knows this where you are at tonight t was one of the leaders today with the broad-based rally. let's get everybody updated with our market focus today. a new month, and new buying today with a broad-based stock gains. buyers got out early, with the s&p 50jumping from the opening bell on the back of optimism ahead of tomorrow's employment report. the gains held through the session with the index finishing up by 1%. trading volume today was 793 million shares on the big board; just under 1.9 billion on the nasdaq. the materials sector led the way higher, up 2%. the technology and industrials sectors came next, gaining 1.8% each today. u.s. steel was the top materials stock, building its rally thanks to suriserofit in its latest quarter. shares jumped 5.7%, even though the company forecasts break-even results in the current quarter. it's expecting to see lower prices and lower shipments for some types of steel. two other material companies-- gold miners barrick gold and newmon
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that's not a political statement, that is a factual statement. anyone who says that there's not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. >>> there may be denial over what caused hurricane sandy, but no denying its effect. absolute devastation. the storm surge that battered the jersey shore in lower manhattan was dramatic, but climate scientists say, get ready. there are more sandys sure to come. >>> what is also sure to come is more bitter fighting over climate change. mitt romney drew a laugh at the national convention in august when he said this. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans, and heal the planet. >> former president bill clinton hit back at those comments this week. >> he ridiculed the president, ridiculed the president for his efforts to fight global warming and economically benphyllo phye ways. he said, oh, you're going to turn
be scanned optically. the state of virginia also use that technology. in pennsylvania, "the wall street journal" reporting that officials say counties should have enough paper ballots for 20% to 25% of expected voters because touch screen voting machines may be expected to run on battery power if they have to. it's a mixed bag. all the states have to reach out and find out what their needs are, carol. >> the most impacted states, of course, new jersey and new york are pretty much blue states. what if this happened in ohio? >> yeah, i know. but, you know and i know, carol, we both come from ohio. and we also know that people there are pretty hardy and the weather has to get pretty darp bad before people say they've got a real problem. big picture, though. it's pretty clear that the state has emergency rules that govern natural disasters, the state needs to follow its own rule. new york has a rule that might be construed to say if you have an emergency affecting a threshold portion of the voting population in a particular area, you can extend the election one day at a time for up to 20 da
in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water clos
technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly. in the weekdays with bernie segment tonight. after the storm chaos subsides most likely on thursday
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 326 (some duplicates have been removed)